Jury FAQs

Who qualifies for jury service?

To qualify for jury service an individual must be at least 18 years of age, a resident of the county, and able to read, write, speak and understand the English language. To qualify, an individual must not have a mental or physical infirmity that would render them incapable of efficient jury service or have been convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment for more than one year.

What if I don't meet the qualifications or cannot be available when I am summoned to appear?

You should contact the Court Administrator to request that you be excused from jury service.

How often must I serve?

If a person serves for one or two days, they need not serve again for a period of one year. If service is for three or more days, the exemption period is three years.

Will I get paid for serving as a juror?

Yes. Jurors are paid $9.00 per day for the first three days of jury service and $25.00 per day for every day thereafter. You will receive a check at the end of your jury service.

Does my employer have to pay me for time missed from work due to jury service?

Under Pennsylvania law, an employer is not required to pay persons during their period of jury service. However, an employer may not fire you or otherwise harm you for responding to a summons.

What should I bring when I report?

You should bring your summons. You may also bring something to read during waiting periods.

What if I fail to report for service?

You may be required to appear in court and you could be held in contempt and fined. However, by making jury service as flexible as possible, we hope to avoid using this power.

What should I wear?

Casual attire should be worn as long as it is in keeping with the dignity of court proceedings. Ties are not required. Slacks, sport shirts, and casual dresses are all appropriate.

Please remember: Weapons, including pen knives, cutting instruments, pepper gas and mace are not permitted in the building and will be confiscated and not returned. Cellular phones are permitted in the Courthouse but not in the courtroom.